City Hall

The Civic Minute: what’s happening at Citrus Heights City Hall? (Jan. 10)

City manager pay raise. Appointments to Planning Commission. Potential change to district-based elections. Annual financial report. Public hearing. Closed session. Those are some of the topics on the agenda for the Citrus Heights City Council’s Jan. 10, 2019 meeting.

Here’s a brief summary of what’s included in the 481-page agenda packet:

SPECIAL MEETING: (6:30 p.m.)

  • Closed Session. City councilmembers will hold a conference with legal counsel in a closed session meeting to discuss “significant exposure to litigation.” Additional details were not included in the agenda packet, but the item may relate to a recent demand letter from an attorney group urging Citrus Heights to change over to district-based elections.

REGULAR MEETING: (7 p.m.)

  • City manager compensation. The City Council will consider approving a 3 percent salary increase for City Manager Christopher Boyd, following a performance evaluation conducted by the council in closed session last month. According to the State Controller’s website, Publicpay.ca.gov, the city manager’s total wages in 2017 were reported at $314,177, with additional health and retirement benefits listed at $76,420.
  • Regional appointments. The City Council will consider making new appointments, from among its ranks, to serve on several regional boards and committees dealing with air quality, sanitation, transportation and regional government. The City Council previously voted to strip Councilman Bret Daniels of his regional committee assignments last year; it remains to be seen if he will be considered for appointments this year.
  • Planning Commission appointments. Mayor Jeannie Bruins and councilmembers Steve Miller and Porsche Middleton, who all won election in November, will each get to nominate one member to serve on the city’s seven-member Planning Commission, with nominations subject to ratification by the entire City Council. Additionally, two at-large positions on the Planning Commission will be selected by the council. The council will also vote to appoint several residents to serve on the city’s Construction Board of Appeals.
  • District-based elections. The City Council will consider a recommendation from the city manager to declare the city’s intent to transition from at-large elections to district-based elections. The recommendation follows the city’s receipt of a demand letter from an attorney group last month, urging the city to switch to district-based elections or face legal action. For more, see story: Demand letter says Citrus Heights elections must change

PUBLIC HEARING:

  • Low-income housing. The City Council will hold a public hearing and consider two options related to a 47-unit supportive housing development proposed at 7424 Sunrise Blvd. The council will consider affirming a Planning Commission recommendation to approve a design review permit for the project and deny the granting of a concession to allow parking in a setback area near adjacent homes, or the council may opt to grant the concession and approve the full project as proposed by the developer. For more, see story: Fate of low-income supportive housing project to be decided by City Council
    • In a related agenda item following the public hearing, the council will also consider approving a request from the project’s developer to allocate $1.3 million in federal HUD financing for the project, through a “HOME Investment Partnerships Program” that Citrus Heights is a member of.

ALSO ON THE AGENDA:

  • $299k funding. The City Council will consider a request to approve a supplemental agreement with Caltrans related to the city being given an additional $299,000 from a state SB 1-Local Partnership Program. The additional funds will cover a funding shortfall for the Mariposa Avenue Safe Routes To School Project, phase 3. The project seeks to complete pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure between Skycrest Elementary and San Juan High schools and along Farmgate Avenue. The lowest bid on the project last year exceeded the city’s estimate by 40 percent, causing the city to reject the bid and seek additional funding from the state.
  • Annual financial report & audit. The council will be asked to formally accept and file a 170-page comprehensive annual financial report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2018. The report is accompanied by a letter stating the city’s financial statements were audited by Richardson & Company, LLP, a certified public accounting firm based in Sacramento. Among other items in the report, the city showed total annual revenue of $45.7 million, down about $2 million from the prior year.
  • Street repaving completed. The first six sections of residential streets to be repaved with SB 1 “gas tax” funds have now been completed and the contract will be presented to the council for a formal motion of final acceptance. The final price of repaving was $614,000, up by about 3 percent from the initial bid due to a change order being made during the course of work for $18,000.
  • Citation processing contract. The City Council will consider a staff recommendation to renew a contract with Phoenix Group Information Systems for parking and administrative citation processing, collections, and management of related billing and reporting of unpaid fines. The contract was first put in place in 2003. Costs to the city for the processing and receiving payment for a standard parking citation are listed at about $1, with the cost being paid by revenues generated from citation fines.

The meeting will also include a presentation by the Sacramento County Grand Juror’s Association and recognition of outgoing Mayor Steve Miller, who served a one-year term as mayor in 2018 and has been replaced by Jeannie Bruins.

The City Council will convene at 6:30 p.m. at 6360 Fountain Square Drive on Jan. 10, 2019, for its closed session meeting and will resume with a public session at 7 p.m. The full agenda packet can be viewed by clicking here.